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William Hunter and the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow, 1807-2007

Lawrence Keppie

Paperback (Printed to Order)
£28.99

This book describes the life and achievements of the eighteenth-century Scottish physician William Hunter and outlines the history of the Museum named after him. William Hunter built up a wide-ranging private collection at his home in London, encompassing not only anatomical and pathological specimens related to his medical work, but also books and manuscripts, coins and medals, natural history specimens and artworks. On his death in 1783 he bequeathed the collection to the University of Glasgow where he had long ago been a student, and money to construct a Museum which opened in 1807. The book utilises a wide range of source material, much of it previously unpublished, to tell the story of the Museum's development, the many subsequent additions to its holdings and, more recently, the construction of a new Hunterian Art Gallery which houses not only Hunter's own collection but also numerous works be James McNeill Whistler and Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The Museum is celebrating its bicentenary in 2007.

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Contents

Foreword
Introduction
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations used in the Notes
1. William Hunter's Life and Career
2. Growth of the Hunterian Collection
3. 'The noblest Legacy upon Record'
4. A Temple of the Muses: the first Hunterian Museum in Glasgow
5. 'This place of fascination': the Impact of the Museum, 1807-70
6. A new Museum for a new University, 1870-1900
7. The Twentieth Century: War, Peace and Renewal, 1900-75
8. The Hunterian Art Gallery
9. Modern Times, 1975-2007
10. Overview: Meeting William Hunter's Intentions
Postscript: Looking to the Future
Appendix: Catalogues of the Hunterian Collections
Bibliography
Index.

About the Author

Lawrence Keppie, until his recent retirement, was a curator at the Hunterian Museum. He has written widely on Roman Scotland and the Roman army and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.