Recommend to your Librarian

Request a Review Copy


Twenty-First-Century Children’s Gothic

From the Wanderer to Nomadic Subject

Chloé Germaine Buckley

Hardback (Not yet published)
£75.00

Outlines a new critical paradigm for reading children’s Gothic literature and film

This is the first monograph that brings together the fields of Gothic Studies and children’s fiction to analyse a range of popular and literary works for children published since 2000. It offers a completely new way of reading children’s Gothic that counters the dominant critical positions in both Gothic Studies and children’s literature criticism. This book contends that the Gothic, as it is repurposed in children’s fiction, is a creative force through which to imagine positive self-transformation. It rejects the pedagogical model of children’s literature criticism, which analyses and assess works based on what or how they teach the child, and instead draws on the theories of Deleuze and Guattari, Rosi Braidotti and Benedict Spinoza to develop the theme of ‘nomadic subjectivity’.

Show more

Contents

Introduction: From Gothic Wanderer to Nomadic Subject
1. Un-homing Psychoanalysis through Neil Gaiman’s Coraline
2. Fleeing Identification in Darren Shan’s Zom-B
3. Exiled Lovers and Gothic Romance in Jamila Gavin’s Coram Boy and Paula Morris’s Ruined
4. Relocating the mainstream in Frankenweenie and Paranorman
5. The ‘Great Outdoors’ in the Weird fiction of Derek Landy and Anthony Horowitz
Conclusions: Francis Hardinge’s The Lie Tree and beyond
Works Cited.

About the Author

Chloé Germaine Buckley is Senior Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University. She writes about and teaches children’s literature and culture. Her previous publications include articles on children's Gothic, Weird fiction, witches and the postcolonial Gothic. She is co-editor of the edited collection, Telling it Slant: Critical Approaches on Helen Oyeyemi (2017) with Sarah Ilott.

Reviews

This book is full of insights into how children's literature reflects and refracts social tensions and anxieties. It takes us on a tour through some of the dark spaces of the early twenty-first century, and is written with vigour and excitement as well as scholarly accuracy.

- David Punter, Professor of Poetry, University of Bristol

This book is full of insights into how children's literature reflects and refracts social tensions and anxieties. It takes us on a tour through some of the dark spaces of the early twenty-first century, and is written with vigour and excitement as well as scholarly accuracy.

- David Punter, Professor of Poetry, University of Bristol

You might also like ...