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The United States and European Reconstruction

1945-1960

John Killick

Paperback (Print on demand)
£26.99

An accessible introduction to a key aspect in economic history – the impact of American financial intervention in Europe after the Second World War. Did 'American dollars save the world' in 1947? Would Europe have revived spontaneously after 1945? If the Marshall Plan – in conjunction with NATO – created a coherent and prosperous western bloc, was this critical for the outcome of the Cold War? Did American policy in some way cause the substantial convergence since 1945 intransatlantic productivity, incomes and living styles, or was this convergence bound to happen anyway?

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About the Author

John Killick is Lecturer in Economic History at the University of Leeds.

Reviews

Very readable ... Killick's treatment of the subject is admirable. He presents statistical information in a manner understandable to the most statistically challenged. The analysis is careful and the answers accessible. This work will no doubt be a ubiquitous feature in the reading lists for courses on economics as well as European history.


 

- American Studies in Britain

This book was the only general account of the Marshall plan to grace the Plan's 50th birthday, and to do so with some disagreements with the prevailing interpretation ... It is the shortest, most accessible, and probably the cheapest overall survey available, and is by no means confined in its value to students. It is clearly and pleasantly written and comes with a very good bibliography.

- Journal of Economic History

"Even so, Killick's book is the shortest, most accessible, and probably the cheapest overall survey available, and is by no means confined in its value to students. It is clearly and pleasantly written and comes with a very good bibliography..."

- Alan Milward, Journal of Economic History, Vol. 59, No. 2

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