The Modernist Party

Edited by Kate McLoughlin

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Leading international scholars illuminate the party’s significance in Modernism

In 12 chapters internationally distinguished scholars explore the party both as a literary device and as a forum for developing modernist creative values, opening up new perspectives on materiality, the everyday and concepts of space, place and time. There are chapters on Conrad and domestic parties, T S Eliot’s ‘Prufrock’, the party vector in Joyce’s ‘The Dead’ and Finnegans Wake, Katherine Mansfield’s party stories, Virginia Woolf’s idea of a party, the textual parties of Proust, Ford Madox Ford and Aldous Huxley and the real-life parties of Sylvia Beach, Adrienne Monnier, Natalie Barney and Gertrude Stein, the black ‘after-party’ of the Harlem Renaissance and the parties in extremis in D H Lawrence’s Women in Love.

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A Note of Thanks
The Guest-List
Introduction: A Welcome from the Host, Kate McLoughlin
‘It was indeed a quiet dinner’: Domestic Parties in the Work of Joseph Conrad, Susan Jones
Prufrock, Party-Goer: Tongue-Tied at Tea, Kate McLoughlin
Party Joyce: from the ‘Dead’ to when we ‘Wake’, Jean-Michel Rabaté
‘Looking at the party with you’: Pivotal Moments in Katherine Mansfield’s Party Stories, Angela Smith
Virginia Woolf’s Idea of a Party, Bryony Randall
Proustian Peristalsis: Parties Before, During and After, David R. Ellison
‘Ezra through the open door’: The Parties of Natalie Barney, Adrienne Monnier and Sylvia Beach as Lesbian Modernist Cultural Production, Joanne Winning
‘Indeed everybody did come’: Parties, Publicity and Intimacy in Gertrude Stein’s Plays, Alex Goody
The Interracial Party of Modernist Primitivism and the Black ‘After-Party’, Margo Natalie Crawford
The Party In Extremis in D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love, Margot Norris
Bohemian Retrospects: Ford Madox Ford, Post-War Memory and the Cabaret Theatre Club, Nathan Waddell
‘Pleasure too often repeated’: Aldous Huxley’s Modernity, Morag Shiach
Even the most cursory of glances over its contents reveals a substantial critical investment, on the part of editor...The volume certainly breaks new ground in the fields of material cultures, modernist networking, and space and place studies.
Charlotte Charteris, Cambridge Quarterly Review, Vol. 43, no 2
This is terrific scholarship; it is stimulating, productive, and fun; and it suggests opportunities for many new and engaging approaches.
Victoria Kuttainen, James Joyce Quarterly, Volume 51, Number 1
We read [the] text with the conviction that the writer or editor has a tale to tell, and a reason to tell this tale, which lends each text in turn a zestiness and a reason to read on. And in a critical space that is already crowded with texts tussling for our attention, this is a welcome surprise.
Tara Stubbs, University of Oxford, Journal of American Studies / Volume 49 / Issue 03
‘I really like the idea of treating the party as a site of modernist invention and contention.’Sean Latham, University of Tulsa‘Intriguing. There should be more fun in Modernist Studies.’David Trotter, University of Cambridge
Sean Latham, University of Tulsa; David Trotter, University of Cambridge
‘I really like the idea of treating the party as a site of modernist invention and contention.’Sean Latham, University of Tulsa‘Intriguing. There should be more fun in Modernist Studies.’David Trotter, University of Cambridge
Sean Latham, University of Tulsa; David Trotter, University of Cambridge
Kate McLoughlin is an Associate Professor of English Literature at the University of Oxford. She is the author of Authoring War: The Literary Representation of War from the Iliad to Iraq (2011) and Martha Gellhorn: The War Writer in the Field and in the Text (2007) and the editor of The Cambridge Companion to War Writing (2009).

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