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The Jalayirids

Dynastic State Formation in the Mongol Middle East

Patrick Wing

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The story of how one tribal family claimed the legacy of Chinggis Qan in Persia

The period of Middle Eastern history between the collapse of the Mongol Ilkhanate in 1335 and the rise of Timur (Tamerlane) at the end of the fourteenth century is commonly seen as a tumultuous time of political breakdown and disorder. This book helps to make sense of this confusing period by tracing the origins, history and memory of the Jalayirid dynasty, a family that succeeded the Mongol Ilkhans in Iran and Iraq in the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries and claimed to be the rightful heirs of the Chinggisid Mongols. The story of how the Jalayirids came to power is illustrative of the political dynamics that shaped much of the Mongol and post-Mongol period in the Middle East.

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Contents

Acknowledgements
Abbreviations for Primary and Secondary Source Texts
Chapter 1. Introduction and Sources for the History of the Jalayirids
Chapter 2. Tribes and the Chinggisid Empire
Chapter 3. The Jalayirs and the Early Ilkhanate
Chapter 4. From Tribal Amirs to Royal In-Laws
Chapter 5. Crisis and Transition (1335-1356)
Chapter 6. Shaykh Uvays and the Jalayirid Dynasty
Chapter 7. Dynastic Ideology during the Reign of Shaykh Uvays
Chapter 8. Challenges to the Jalayirid Order
Chapter 9. Conclusions and the Legacy of the Jalayirids
Maps
Genealogy of the Jalayirid Dynasty
Bibliography
Index

About the Author

Patrick Wing is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Redlands. His research focuses on the history of the Middle East in the period of the Mongols and their successors.

Reviews

This book is the first significant study in English of one of the major powers in Iran and Anatolia during the decades following the collapse of Mongol rule there after 1335. It sheds a flood of light not only on that, but on many aspects of the earlier period of Mongol rule.

- David Morgan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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