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The Iraqi Novel

Key Writers, Key Texts

Fabio Caiani, Catherine Cobham

Hardback
£65.00
eBook (PDF) i
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Studies a neglected area of postcolonial fiction, fostering a better understanding of Iraqi culture and society

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Contents

Acknowledgements
Preface
1 Introduction: The Awakening Story
2 Revolutionary Pioneer: 'Abd al-Malik Nuri in Six Stories
3 Realism and Space in the First Iraqi Novel
4 From Khamsat Aswat to al-Markab: 'Writing about the People of Iraq'
5 The Other Shore: Dialogue and Difference in Mahdi 'Isa al-Saqr's al-Shati' al-thani
6 Two Houses, Two Women: Iraq at War in Mahdi 'Isa al-Saqr's Novels
7 Reading and Writing in al-Masarrat wa-'l-awja' by Fu'ad al-Takarli
8 The Long Way Back: Possibilities for Survival and Renewal in al-Raj' al-ba'id by Fu'ad al-Takarli
Epilogue: Reflections on Iraqi Fiction, Influence and Exile, or the Life and Times of Yusuf Ibn Hilal.

About the Author

Fabio Caiani teaches Arabic in the Department of Arabic of the University of St Andrews. His research focuses on modern Arabic fiction. His publications (in either English or Italian) include the monograph Contemporary Arab Fiction: Innovation from Rama to Yalu (Routledge: 2007) on the Post-Mahfuzian novel, and studies of Yusuf Idris, Edwar al-Kharrat and Elias Khoury.

Catherine Cobham is a lecturer in Arabic language and literature at the University of St Andrews. She has published research on Yusuf Idris, Naguib Mahfouz, Edwar al-Kharrat, Abdelilah Hamdouchi and Hanan Al-Shaykh. She has also translated the works of Adonis, Naguib Mahfouz, Mahmoud Darwish, Hanan al-Shaykh and Fuad al-Takarli, amongst others.

Reviews

This book fills a significant gap in critical studies in English of Arabic Literature, being the first major book on the modern Iraqi novel. I have no doubt it will be read with pleasure and profit by all who have an interest in the literature and history of modern Iraq.

- Professor Clive Holes, University of Oxford

'A welcome analytical contribution to the understudied corpus of Iraqi fiction, which is bound to appeal not only to scholars of Arabic literature and literary analysis, but anyone interested in fiction, literary translation, and Iraqi culture.'

- Yasmeen Hanoosh, Portland State University, Journal of Arabic Literature

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