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The Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland, Volume 4: Professionalism and Diversity 1880–2000

Edited by David Finkelstein, Alistair McCleery

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In this volume a range of distinguished contributors provide an original analysis of the book in Scotland during a period that has been until now greatly under-researched and little understood.

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Contents

Illustrations and Tables
Abbreviations
Acknowledgements
Chronology
Introduction
1. The Publishing Infrastructure, 1880-1980
Section One Overview David Finkelstein/Alistair McCleery
The Competitors Richard Butt
Rob Roy from page to screen Richard Butt
The Professionalisation of Publishing David Finkelstein
Scottish Publishers' Association Helen Williams
Scottish PEN Moira Burgess
Development of Library Provision in Scotland 1880-2000 John Crawford
Airdrie Public Library John Crawford
PM Dott Memorial Socialist Library Helen Williams
Scottish Poetry Library David Finkelstein
The Business of Publishing Iain Stevenson
A Family Affair Alistair McCleery
Salamander Press Rosemary Addison
Mainstream Alistair McCleery
Role of the Scottish Arts Council Alistair McCleery
Selling to the World 1880-2000 Alistair McCleery
Nelson's French collection Siân Reynolds
No.1 Ladies Detective Agency Alistair McCleery
The Development of the Bookshop, Home Sales and Exports Simon Ward
John Menzies David Finkelstein
2. Production, Form and Image
Section Two Overview David Finkelstein/Alistair McCleery
The Definition of the Book as Physical Object Duncan Glen
Scottish Paper Mills Alistair McCleery
Mechanical Typesetting Helen Williams
Thomas Nelson and Sons Alistair McCleery
Typography Duncan Glen
Women Compositors Siân Reynolds
The Printing Industry Alistair McCleery
Design and Illustration Rosemary Addison
Agnes Miller Parker Rosemary Addison
Joan Hassall Rosemary Addison
The Book and Photography Tom Normand
Reproducing Images Alistair McCleery
The Books of Ian Hamilton Finlay Ken Cockburn
3. Publishing Policies: The Literary Culture
Section Three Overview David Finkelstein/Alistair McCleery
The Changing Face of the Publishing House Andrew Nash
John Buchan, Publisher Kate MacDonald
Jamie Byng, Publisher Alistair McCleery
Literary Publishing, 1880-1914 Andrew Nash
R.L. Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Linda Dryden and Richard Drury
'Scots Observer' Damian Atkinson
Literary Publishing, 1914-1945 Margery Palmer-McCulloch
Scottish Literary Magazines Alistair McCleery
Blackwoods and Hugh MacDiarmid David Finkelstein
Naomi Mitchison Rosemary Addison
Literary Publishing, 1945-2000 Jane Potter
Muriel Spark Rosemary Addison
'Akros' and 'Cencrastus' Zsuzsanna Vargas
John Calder Louise Milne
Literary Prizes Claire Squires
Stephanie Wolfe-Murray Zsuszanna Vargas
The Gaelic Book Richard Cox
4. Publishing Policies: The Diversity of Print
Section Four Overview David Finkelstein/Alistair McCleery
Religious Publishing Henry Sefton
William Robertson Smith Alistair McCleery
T & T Clark David Finkelstein
Life and Work Alistair McCleery
Educational, Academic and Legal Publishing Sarah Pedersen
Edinburgh University Press Alistair McCleery
Collins Iain Stevenson
Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishing Iain Stevenson
Cartographic Publishing Iain Stevenson
Official Publishing Iain Stevenson
Reference Publishing Sarah Pedersen
Chambers Harrap Alistair McCleery
Children's Books 1880-2000 Jane Potter
Blackie Jane Potter
Treasure Island Helen Williams
Kelpies Helen Williams
Magazines and Comics Joseph McAleer
The Dandy, Beano and the Broons Joseph McAleer
Leo Baxendale and Alan Grant Alistair McCleery
5. Authors and Readers
Section Five Overview David Finkelstein/Alistair McCleery
Authors in the Literary Marketplace Andrew Nash
Annie S. Swan Andrew Nash
Neil M. Gunn Alistair McCleery
Joyce Holms Simon Ward
The Economics of Authorship Simon Ward
Literary Agents Simon Ward
Authorship in 2001 Alistair McCleery
Readers, Reading and the Global Marketplace David Finkelstein
Ladies Edinburgh Debating Society David Finkelstein
Ralph Glasser Linda Fleming
Children's Reading in 1989 Alistair McCleery
Harry Potter Helen Williams
Edinburgh International Book Festival David Finkelstein
6. The Future of the Book in Scotland
Trends and prospects David Finkelstein/Alistair McCleery
The New 'New Media' Suzanne Ebel
Encyclopedia Britannica: Edinburgh to Chicago, Print to PC
Jane Potter
Contributors
Bibliography
Index.

About the Author

David Finkelstein is Dean of the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Dundee. His research interests focus on print culture and media history. Publications include The House of Blackwood: Author-Publisher Relations in the Victorian Era (2002) and as editor, Print Culture and the Blackwood Tradition, 1805-1930 (2006). He has also co-authored with Alistair McCleery An Introduction to Book History (2005), and co-edited The Book History Reader (2001; revised edition 2006).

Alistair McCleery is Professor of Literature and Culture at Napier University in Edinburgh. He is co-author with David Finkelstein of the two standard textbooks in the field, An Introduction to Book History (Routledge 2005) and The Book History Reader (Revised Edition, Routledge 2006). He also co-edits The Bibliotheck, a journal of bibliography and book history. He has published widely on Scottish and Irish literature, particularly Neil Gunn and James Joyce.

Reviews

A splendid contribution to the publishing, literary and cultural history of Scotland (and beyond).
- Helen C Price, Rare Books Newsletter
Both [Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland, Volumes 3 and 4] are handsomely illustrated, and make use of typographic devices, such as subheadings, chronologies, tables and inserted boxes of text to make it easier for users to find their way.
- Times Literary Supplement
Like much else that the University Press does...this represents a substantial contribution to the emergence of Scottish literary history and criticism ... The books themselves continue another fine tradition of Edinburgh University Press in their handsome production and lavish illustration. They will become, already are, indispensable parts of our knowledge of Scotland in this century.
- Ian Campbell, University of Edinburgh Journal

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