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The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts

Edited by Maggie Humm

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The most authoritative and up-to-date guide to Virginia Woolf's artistic influences and associations

In original, extensive and newly researched chapters by internationally recognised authors, the Companion explores Woolf's ideas about creativity and the nature of art in the context of the recent 'turn to the visual' in modernist studies with its focus on visual technologies and the significance of material production. The in-depth chapters place Woolf's work in relation to the most influential aesthetic theories and artistic practices, including Bloomsbury aesthetics, art and race, Vanessa Bell and painting, art galleries, theatre, music, dance, fashion, entertaining, garden and book design, broadcasting, film, and photography.

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Contents

Cited editions of Virginia Woolf and Abbreviations
List of Figures
List of Plates
Virginia Woolf and the Arts, Maggie Humm
Part 1: Aesthetics
1. Virginia Woolf and Victorian Aesthetics, Kate Flint
2. Virginia Woolf and Modernist Aesthetics, Jane Goldman
3. Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury, Anthony Uhlmann
Aesthetics
4. Virginia Woolf: Performing Race, Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina
5. Virginia Woolf and City Aesthetics, Vara S. Neverow
6. Virginia Woolf and Realist Aesthetics, Linden Peach
Part 2: Paintings
7. Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell and Painting, Diane F. Gillespie
8. Virginia Woolf, Art Galleries and Museums, Benjamin Harvey
9. Virginia Woolf and Portraiture, Elizabeth Hirsh
Part 3: Domestic Arts
10. Virginia Woolf and Monks House, Victoria Rosner
11. Virginia Woolf and Fashion, Jane Garrity
12. Virginia Woolf and Bohemian Lifestyles, Liz and Peter Brooker
13. Virginia Woolf and Entertaining, Makiko Minow-Pinkney
14. Virginia Woolf and Gardens, Nuala Hancock
Part 4: Publishing, Broadcasting & Technology
15. Virginia Woolf as Publisher and Editor: The Hogarth Press, Laura Marcus
16. Virginia Woolf and Book Design, Tony Bradshaw
17. Virginia Woolf and Scrapbooking, Merry M. Pawlowski
18. Virginia Woolf and the Art of Journalism, Patrick Collier
19. Virginia Woolf, Radio, Gramophone, Broadcasting, Pamela L. Caughie
Part 5: Visual Media
20. Virginia Woolf and Film, Leslie K. Hankins
21. Virginia Woolf and Photography, Colin Dickey
22. Virginia Woolf Icon, Brenda R. Silver
Part 6: Performance Arts
23. Virginia Woolf and Music, Joyce E. Kelley
24. Virginia Woolf and Theatre, Steven Putzel
25. Virginia Woolf and Dance, Evelyn Haller
Notes on Contributors
Index.

About the Author

Maggie Humm is a Professor of Cultural Studies in the School of Humanities and Social Science at the University of East London. She is the author of many books including Snapshots of Bloomsbury: The Private Lives of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell (Tate Publishing & Rutgers University Press, 2006) and Modernist Women and Visual Cultures: Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, Photography and Cinema (Edinburgh University Press & Rutgers University Press 2002).

Reviews

The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts gathers a stellar group of scholars to exemplify the range and depth of Woolf's engagement with the arts. This remarkable collection shows that whether engaged with music, painting, dance, cinema, fashion, photography, decoration or entertaining, Woolf stands at the heart of the dynamism and innovations of twentieth-century aesthetics. The Companion will be a rich and provocative resource for anyone with an interest in modern culture.

- Mark Hussey, Editor, Woolf Studies Annual

'Editor Maggie Humm and colleagues can certainly be congratulated on succeeding in this exhaustive and groundbreaking task! Almost every book, essay and autobiographical detail of the author have been seamlessly bound together with the broadest definition of art, from script to screen, page to performance – making the Edinburgh Companion an invaluable resource for the “common reader” and students of art alike ... Scholars of art, literature, gender studies, film, modernism and – of course – Virginia Woolf herself will find the essays in the Edinburgh Companion of considerable interest and appeal at every level.'

- Sarah Powell, Bradford Library, Reference Reviews
This book appears at a time when scholarly interest has travelled far down the many tributaries connecting Virginia Woolf to the cultural moment in which she lived and worked. No previous book, however, has attempted an overview of the significance of the arts to Woolf. Hence the need for this all encompassing endeavour. Its breadth of interest catches many topics, from gardens to the aesthetics of the city, from scrapbooks and journalism to dance, music, film, photography and the theatre. It is rich in overlap and fertile creative tensions. Its catholicity also embraces differing levels of debate and a range of methodologies. In some areas it summarises existing knowledge, in others it sets up new avenues of enquiry. But, as a whole, this is a richly variegated assortment of essays. It will, for a long time, remain a most useful compendium.
- Frances Spalding, art historian, critic and biographer

'Editor Maggie Humm and colleagues can certainly be congratulated on succeeding in this exhaustive and groundbreaking task! Almost every book, essay and autobiographical detail of the author have been seamlessly bound together with the broadest definition of art, from script to screen, page to performance – making the Edinburgh Companion an invaluable resource for the “common reader” and students of art alike ... Scholars of art, literature, gender studies, film, modernism and – of course – Virginia Woolf herself will find the essays in the Edinburgh Companion of considerable interest and appeal at every level.'

- Sarah Powell, Bradford Library

The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts successfully relocates Woolf's literary output within her contemporary artistic and cultural contexts. This ambitious volume consolidates the return to aesthetics within recent Woolf scholarship and demonstrates the breadth of approaches now encompassed within this fruitful area of enquiry.

- Alice Wood, University of Portsmouth, Women's History Review

[A] major contribution to Woolf studies and one which I found invaluable as a source of reference.

- John Shapcott, Arnold Bennett Society Newsletter

Maggie Humm’s The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts achieves cohesiveness through expansiveness. Taking Woolf’s engagement with the arts in the broadest sense as their theme, the twenty-five essays in this collection comprehensively explore this important aspect of Woolf’s career.

- Years Work in English Studies, vol 91, no 1, 2012

This generous collection of twenty-six essays on Woolf’s relation to every conceivable aspect of the arts from philosophies of aesthetics to photography, film, and dance to entertaining, gardening, and scrapbooking looks like a useful reference text to have on one’s shelf and/ or recommend for purchase by the local academic library. Further perusal, however, additionally reveals a lively series of conversations on the cutting edge of ongoing debates in Woolf scholarship whose relevance to many of the larger issues at play in the profession makes for entertaining and enlightening reading.

- Woolf Studies Annual, Volume 18, 2012

The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts is ambitious, comprehensive, and intellectually suggestive - sufficiently so in each of these contexts that it will be an indispensable resource for scholars, serious students, and common readers of Woolf and the arts for some years to come.

- Roberta Rubenstein, American University, Virginia Woolf Miscellany

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