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The Collected Letters of James Hogg, Volume 3, 1832-1835

James Hogg
Edited by Gillian Hughes

Hardback (In stock)
£80.00

The third and final volume of the first collected edition of Hogg's letters reveals his versatility in old age. In 1832 he visits London for the first time and becomes the literary lion of the season. As communications improve in the early 1830s he explores the possibility of writing for American periodicals, and deals (mostly) gracefully with the various claims made on his time as a celebrity author. The loss of old friends is compensated for by a circle of young admirers and protégés, and Hogg turns an acutely observant eye on an age of cheap periodicals and of political reform.

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About the Author

James Hogg was a Scottish poet, novelist and essayist who wrote in both Scots and English. He is best known for his novel The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner.

Gillian Hughes is Advisory Editor to The New Edinburgh Edition of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson. She was editor and/or general editor for many volumes in the Stirling/South Carolina Hogg edition, founding editor of the journal Studies in Hogg and his World, and is the author of James Hogg: A Life (Edinburgh University Press, 2007). Her current projects include an edition (co-edited with Peter Garside) of the Shorter Verse of Walter Scott.

Reviews

So wonderful a treat that one wishes it weren't the final volume in the series.

- SEL - Studies in English Literature 1500-1900
Editing the Letters gives as thorough a knowledge of a writer like Hogg as could be hoped for: and Hughes and her colleagues display scrupulous scholarship in an exemplary way, for the reader to consult without losing the thread.
- The Scotsman
The letters that comprise this three-volume set provide a wealth of fresh material for students of Hogg and Scottish literature specifically, and for researchers of early nineteenth-century literature, culture, and history more generally.... ...the third volume of his correspondence offers an especially thorough and 'thick' account of his literary activity.
- Holly Faith Nelson, Scottish Literary Review

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