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Sibawayh on ?imalah (Inclination)

Text, Translation, Notes and Analysis

Solomon I. Sara

Hardback
£130.00
An eighth-century scholar and linguist born in Persia, S

Contents

PART I. PRELIMINARIES
1. Preface
2. Introduction
PART II. TEXT AND TRANSLATION
1. Chapter one
2. Chapter two
3. Chapter three
4. Chapter four
5. Chapter five
6. Chapter six
PART III. ANALYSIS
7. Analysis of chapter one
8. Analysis of chapter two
9. Analysis of chapter three
10. Analysis of chapter four
11. Analysis of chapter five
12. Analysis of chapter six
13. Dialects
14. Conclusions
PART IV. SUPPLEMENTARIES
List of Technical terms sorted by Arabic
List of Technical terms sorted by English
List of Technical terms sorted by transcription
List of Examples
References Consulted.

Reviews

An important contribution to the subject of phonology in Classical Arabic Linguistics, this book deals with the treatise of the Imalah by the founder of Arabic linguistics, Sibawayh, who is also a great grammarian and the creator of the most comprehensive systematic description of classical Arabic grammar. This translation by Professor Sara is faithful and his analyses are masterfully accurate. The book makes a significant contribution to Arabic linguistics in general and to phonetics and phonology of the language in particular. It is a very welcome addition to our increasing number of studies on the foundational analyses of Classical Arabic Linguistics.
- Bassam K. Frangieh, Yale University
Finally, this book is an important contribution to Arabic Phonetics and specifically to the investigation of the phenomenon of inclination. It serves as an excellent model to any future attempt of translation of studies on the Arabic language and its structure.
- Salman H. Al-Ani, Indiana University, Bloomington,, The Phonetician
Professor Sara’s rigorous and innovative work, with its "rich translation format", gets to the inner depths of the text and immediately helps the reader realize that Sibawayh and his contemporaries were in fact operating, not within any Western or Eastern paradigms, but rather within their own paradigm of Arabic linguistics. It is a very welcome and long-awaited contribution to the fields of Arabic language and linguistics, history of Arabic grammatical tradition, and history and historiography of linguistics.
- Mohammad T. Alhawary, Professor of Arabic Language, University of Oklahoma