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Rome in Late Antiquity

Everyday Life and Urban Change, AD 312-609

Bertrand Lançon

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£45.00
Hardback (Print on demand)
£110.00

This is a history of life in ancient Rome from the third to the seventh centuries AD. At the beginning of the period Rome was the centre of civilisation, by far the greatest city in the world, whose vast revenues supplied its million people with lavish provisions of food and wine and at least one hundred days of spectacular entertainment each year. It was a city of pristine marble, brightly coloured stucco, with temple and government buildings roofed in dazzling gold and bronze. Its citizens had access to public baths, gardens, libraries, circuses, amphitheatres, and venues for sea-fight spectacles. Well-maintained roads and aqueducts stretched from it in all directions.

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About the Author

Bertrand Lançon is Professor of Ancient History at the University of Valenciennes.

Reviews

A lively introduction to its complex subject ... the best such introduction on the market ... Lancon draws on precisely those passages in late antique authors that most of us try to bring out in class discussions and seminars in order to illustrate the substance of Latin late antiquity ... a lively and remarkably informative introduction to the way late Roman institutions and social conventions functioned in a city that did, after all, remain the symbolic centre of the Roman world.
A lively introduction to its complex subject ... Lançon draws on precisely those passages in late antique authors that most of us try to bring out in class discussions and seminars in order to illustrate the substance of Latin late antiquity... a lively and remarkably informative introduction to the way late Roman institutions and social conventions functioned in a city that did, after all, remain the symbolic centre of the Roman world.