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Romantic Gothic

An Edinburgh Companion

Edited by Angela Wright, Dale Townshend

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Provides a detailed, rigorous account of the rise and development of the Gothic aesthetic in British, American and European culture between 1740 and 1840

Self-consciously breaching the critical divide between what literary history has subsequently differentiated as the ‘Gothic’ and the ‘Romantic’, this collection of 17 newly commissioned chapters seeks to draw attention to that prominent strain in late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century British, American and European literature in which the distinction between the popular, low-cultural reaches of the Gothic and the ‘High’ Romantic aesthetics of more canonical figures is all but erased.

Key Features

  • Subjects early Gothic writing to sustained critical attention and re-examination
  • Situates British Gothic writing in relation to contemporary developments of the mode in America and Continental Europe
  • Seeks to advance current scholarly debates particularly with respect to the ongoing interest in the relationship between Romanticism and the Gothic

Contents

Notes on Contributors
1. Gothic and Romantic: An Historical Overview, Dale Townshend and Angela Wright
Part I: Gothic Modes and Forms
1. Graveyard Writing and the Rise of the Gothic, Vincent Quinn
2. Gothic Romance, Deborah Russell
3.The Gothic Stage: Visions of Instability, Performances of Anxiety, Diego Saglia
4. Gothic Poetry and First-Generation Romanticism, Joel Faflak
5. Gothic and Second-Generation Romanticism: Lord Byron, P. B. Shelley, John Polidori and Mary Shelley, Jerrold E. Hogle
6. Political Gothic Fiction, Robert Miles
7. Shorter Gothic Fictions: Ballads and Chapbooks, Tales and Fragments, Douglass H. Thomson and Diane Long Hoeveler
8. Oriental Gothic, Peter Kitson
9. Gothic Parody, Natalie Neill
Part II: National and International Borders
1. Gothic Borders: Scotland, Ireland and Wales, Meiko O’Halloran
2. Gothic Travels, Mark Bennett
3. The Romantic and the Gothic in Europe: The Elementary Spirits in France and Germany as a vehicle for the transmission and development of the Fantastique, 1772-1835, Victor Sage
4. American Gothic Passages, Carol Margaret Davison
Part III: Reading the Romantic Gothic
1. Gothic and the Language of Terror, Jane Hodson
2. Gothic Science, Andrew Smith
3. Gender and Sexuality in Gothic Romanticism, Patrick O’Malley
4. Gothic Forms of Time: Architecture, Romanticism, Medievalism, Tom Duggett
5. Gothic Theology, Alison Milbank.

About the Author

Angela Wright is Professor of Romantic Literature at the University of Sheffield, and currently co-President of the International Gothic Association. A specialist in Romanticism and the Gothic, her previous publications include Gothic Fiction (Palgrave, 2007), Britain, France and the Gothic, 1764-1820: The Import of Terror (Cambridge University Press, 2013); and, with Dale Townshend (eds.) Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Dale Townshend is Senior Lecturer in Gothic and Romantic Studies at the University of Stirling, and director of the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination. His recent publications include The Gothic World (with Glennis Byron; Routledge, 2014); Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic (with Angela Wright; Cambridge University Press, 2014); and Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination (British Library Publishing, 2014). He is currently at work on a monograph entitled Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance and the Architectural Imagination, 1760—1840.

Reviews

Romantic Gothic is directed throughout by exciting new research and original lines of enquiry, featuring new interdisciplinary work on Gothic’s engagements with science, theology, and architecture, and introducing sophisticated transnational perspectives. It will reshape critical understanding of the interlaced styles, and cultures, of Romanticism and Gothic fiction, poetry, and drama.

- Fiona Robertson, St Mary’s University
...a remarkable contribution to its field.
- Lisa Fischer, Review 19

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