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Resistance and Psychoanalysis

Impossible Divisions

Simon Morgan Wortham

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Rethinks how psychoanalysis, political thought and philosophy can be brought together

As calls mount for resistance to recent political events, Simon Morgan Wortham explores the political implications and complexities of a psychoanalytic conception of resistance. Through close readings of a range of authors, both within and outwith the psychoanalytic tradition, the question of the politics of psychoanalysis itself is read back into the task of thinking resistance from a psychoanalytic point of view.

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Contents

Acknowledgements

Preface

Introduction The Love of Lacan (Derrida, Žižek)

Section I Violence and Resistance

1. Impossible Divisions: Fanon, Hegel and psychoanalysis

2. Civility and its Discontents: Balibar, Arendt, Lyotard

3. What is a Complex? Freudian resistances

4. Fleeced: Derrida and ‘the deciding discourse of castration’

5. The University and the Hysteric (after Derrida and Freud)

Section II Phobic Resistances

6. Detestable Residue: from psychoanalysis to Blanchot and Lyotard

7. Something (or Nothing) to be Scared Of: Meillassoux, Klein, Kristeva

8. Fear of the Open: resistances of the public sphere

9. Lupus (Adler and Freud)

About the Author

Simon Morgan Wortham is Professor of English and Pro Vice Chancellor Dean, Arts and Social Sciences, Kingston University.

Reviews

In the context of contemporary debates around new materialisms and modes of existence that double as modes of resistance, Simon Morgan Wortham’s return to the disputes between Derrida and Lacan could not be more timely. The book is essential reading for anyone committed to the future of theory: from the strategic purchase of its analytic antinomies, aporias, frontings, unlockings, counterings, complaints, lapses, drifts and fleecings, to the understanding of what Wortham dubs, with decided flair, the 'complex' complex.

- Emily Apter, New York University

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