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Postcolonial Imaginings

Fictions of a New World Order

David Punter

Paperback (Print on demand)
£28.99

This deeply engaging, historically and culturally informed book provides new perspectives on a wide range of writers, and at the same time provides a radically new development of many of the most pertinent issues in the field of postcolonial writing and theory. It constitutes a major new engagement between the 'postcolonial' and a conception of the literary which is richly innovative in its deployment of psychoanalytic, deconstructive and other approaches to the text.

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About the Author

David Punter, having worked at universities in England, Scotland, Hong Kong and China, is now Professor of English at the University of Bristol. He has published over twenty monographs and edited collections in the Gothic, romantic writing, modern and contemporary writing, and literary theory. His most recent publications include Writing the Passions (2000); Postcolonial Imaginings: Fictions of a New World Order (2000); Metaphor (2007); Modernity (2007); Rapture: Literature, Addiction, Secrecy (2009); and A New Companion to the Gothic, (ed., 2012). He has also published five volumes of poetry.

Reviews

An ambitious work that performs informative close readings.
- David Punter
In this provocative and important book David Punter opens up new ways of thinking about the postcolonial and the literary. Starting from the idea that "Where are you from?" is a terroristic question, he provides an impassioned and brilliant account of the ineluctable encounters between politics, literature and the uncanny.
- Professor Nicholas Royle, University of Sussex
Raises a plethora of important and interesting questions about, for example, 'history', the relation of literary texts to other 'narratives', and the notion pf the 'literal' reference in a literary text.
- Yearbook of English Studies
An impassioned yet highly learned interrogation of prevalent contemporary theories and practices of postcolonial studies. … A bold and successful attempt at expanding the definition and scope of the 'postcolonial’. … It is a refreshing and salutary contribution.
- Utopian Studies