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Of Jews And Animals

Andrew Benjamin

Hardback
£100.00
eBook (PDF) i
£99.99

By developing his own conception of the 'figure' Andrew Benjamin has written an innovative and provocative study of the complex relationship between philosophy, the history of painting and their presentation of both Jews and animals.

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Contents

Opening
1. Of Jews and Animals
Part 1
2. Living and Being: Descartes' 'Animal Spirits'
and Heidegger's Dog
3. The Insistent Dog: Blanchot and the Community without Animals
4. Indefinite Play and the 'Name of Man': Anthropocentrism's Deconstruction
Part 2
5. What if the other were an animal? Hegel on Jews, Animals and Disease
6. Agamben on 'Jews' and 'Animals'
7. Force, Justice and Jews: Pascal's Pensées 102 and 103
8. Facing Jews
Another Opening
9. Animals Jews.

About the Author

Andrew Benjamin is Professor of Philosophy and Jewish Thought at Monash University where he is a member of both the Department of Philosophy and the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation. He also holds the positions of Distinguished Anniversary Professor of Philosophy and the Humanities at Kingston University in London and Distinguished Professor of Architectural Theory at the University of Technology Sydney.

Reviews

Of Jews and Animals is set to become a key text, alongsidesuch works as Elisabeth de Fontenay’s Le silence des bêtes (1998) and Jacques Derrida’s The Animal That Therefore I Am (2006), in constituting a further and necessary move beyond the utilitarianism and neo-Kantianism within which ‘animal philosophy’ has for so long remained mired.

- Richard Iveson, Goldsmiths, University of London, Parallax
A stimulating book which will help those readers who, interested in the work of Agamben and the late Derrida, wish to reflect more on the image of the animal in classical continental philosophy.
- Peter Fenves, Northwestern University
Andrew Benjamin has written an original and provocative meditation on the place of the 'figure' of the animal in modern philosophy and culture. The book is remarkable for its sensitivity to the issue of visibility and the use of visual material. The engagement with the philosophical history of art is beautifully sustained and serves not only to work through the theme of figuration but also to make the philosophical narrative available to a wider range of readers.
- Howard Caygill, Goldsmith's College
Benjamin's book is an important, insightful, and careful work of scholarship that demonstrates that if we ignore the relationship between Jews and animals we will diminish our understanding of both.
- Aaron Gross, University of Indiana, H-Net Judaic

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