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Noble Power in Scotland from the Reformation to the Revolution

Keith M Brown

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The period between the Reformation and the Covenanting Revolution has generated much historical debate on issues of political authority and power. In this volume Keith M Brown builds on his previous book, Noble Society in Scotland, to argue that in spite of the changes brought about by the Reformation, by the recovery of crown authority and by the regal union between England and Scotland, the huge power exercised by the nobility remained fundamentally unaltered. Hence when political crisis did surface in 1637-8 the crown lacked the means to oppose a noble-led revolution.

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Contents

Domination and Lordship
Contents
Introduction: Scotland in 1070
Narratives
Chapter 1 Out with the Old (1070-1093)
Chapter 2 Kings and pretenders (1093-1136)
Chapter 3 Building the Scoto-Northumbrian Realm (1136-1157)
Chapter 4 Under the Angevin Supremacy (1157-1189)
Chapter 5 Settling the Succession (1189-1230)
Processes
Chapter 6 Power
Chapter 7 Re-working Old Patterns: Rural landscapes and societies
Chapter 8 Towns, Burghs and Burgesses
Chapter 9 Nobles
Chapter 10 The Making of the Ecclesia Scoticana
Guide to Further Reading
Timeline
Bibliography

About the Author

Keith Brown is Professor of History at the University of Manchester. He specializes in early modern Scottish History, particularly the history of parliament and of the nobility.

Reviews

Noble Power’s focus is on power in practice, and Brown’s conclusions about how nobles exercised and maintained power are invaluable.
- Heather Parker, University of Guelph, H-Albion