Islamic Reform in Twentieth-Century Africa

Roman Loimeier

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The first comprehensive analysis of Muslim movements of reform in modern sub-Saharan Africa

Based on twelve case studies (Senegal, Mali, Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Zanzibar and the Comoros), this book looks at patterns and peculiarities of different traditions of Islamic reform. Considering both Sufi- and Salafi-oriented movements in their respective historical contexts, it stresses the importance of the local context to explain the different trajectories of development.

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Glossary of Arabic Terms vi

Foreword xii

A Note on Islamic Transnational Organisations xvii

1 Introduction: The Context of Reform 1

2 What is Reform? 17

3 Reform in Context I: Senegal (and Mali) 64

4 Reform in Context II: Northern Nigeria (and Niger) 145

5 Reform in Context III: Chad, Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia 221

6 Reform in Context IV: Tanganyika/Tanzania (and Kenya) 317

7 Reform in Context V: Zanzibar (and the Comoros) 380

8 Conclusion: The Meaning of Islamic Reform 457

Bibliography 473

Index 000

A result of three decades of fieldwork and travels throughout Africa, [this book] boasts an extensive bibliography and index, and will probably come to be regarded as a reference book for understanding Sufi- and Salafi-oriented and jihad-minded reform movements in the multi-ethnic and multireligious societies of the African continent.
Heinrich Bergstresser, Africa Spectrum
The book is a comprehensive comparative depiction of Islamic reform movements in Africa in historical perspective. Loimeier compellingly demonstrates the complexity and diversity of these movements, subtly analysing the dialectical interaction of international currents and local contexts. This is a tour de force, remarkable for both its breadth and depth.
Robert Launay, Northwestern University
Roman Loimeier is Professor at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Göttingen. He specializes on Muslim societies in Africa and has done extensive fieldwork in Senegal, northern Nigeria and Tanzania as well as shorter research trips to South Africa, Ethiopia, Egypt and Morocco since the early 1980s. He is particularly interested in the history of Islamic reform and the social, religious and political implications of reform.

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