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Islamic Calligraphy

Sheila S. Blair

Hardback (In stock)
£175.00
Joint Winner of the 2007 British-Kuwait Friendship Society Prize for Middle Eastern Studies

Winner of 2008 World Prize for Book of the Year by the Iranian Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance

Selected as a 2007 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title

This stunning book is an important contribution to a key area of non-western art, being the first reference work on the art of beautiful writing in Arabic script.

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Contents

PART I: INTRODUCTION
Chapter 1: Arabic Script: Its Role and Principles
A. The importance of writing in Islamic culture
B. Principles of Arabic script
C. The Koranic Text
Chapter 2: Materials
A. Supports
B. Special papers
C. Pens and pen cases
D. Inks and inkwells
PART II: THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARABIC SCRIPT IN EARLY ISLAMIC TIMES
Chapter 3: The Standardization of Arabic Script
A. The origins of Arabic script
B. The development of Arabic script
C. The evolution of a calligraphic style
Chapter 4: Early Manuscripts of the Koran
A. Physical characteristics
B. Methodologies for dating
C. Considerations for further study
PART III: THE PREEMINENCE OF ROUND SCRIPTS IN THE EARLY MIDDLE PERIOD
Chapter 5: The Adoption of Round Styles
A. Round book script
B. The new style of broken cursive
C. Broken cursive and Ibn Muqla
D. The standardization of naskh and thuluth under Ibn al-Bawwab
E. What caused the canonization of round scripts in the ninth century?
Chapter 6: The Diversification of Round Scripts
A. The stylization of broken cursive
B. Other round scripts
C. Towards a codification of round scripts
D. Pairs of text scripts
E. Maghribi script
PART IV: THE EMERGENCE OF REGIONAL STYLES IN THE LATER MIDDLE PERIOD
Chapter 7: Calligrpahy in Iran and its Environs under the Mongols and Turkomans
A. The Six Pens under the Ilkhanids and Jalayirids
B. The Six Pens under the Timurids and Turkomans
C. The Hanging Scripts

Chapter 8: Rectilinear and Curvilinear Scripts in Egypt and Syria under the Mamluks
A. Rectilinear scripts
B. Curvilinear scripts
C. Hybrid scripts
Chapter 9: Other Styles and Centers
A. Anatolia
B. India
C. The Maghrib
PART V: DYNASTIC STYLES IN THE AGE OF EMPIRES
Chapter 10: The Safavids, the Qajars, and their Contemporaries in Iran and Central Asia
A. Refinement of the Six Pens
B. Refinement of the hanging scripts
C. Pictorial writing
Chapter 11: The Ottomans in Anatolia, the Balkans, and the Eastern Mediterranean
A. The Canonization of naskh as text script Training, sources, and materials
B. The Canonization of thuluth as display script
C. The Hanging scripts
Chapter 12: Other styles and centers
A. The Mughals and their contemporaries in India
B. The Indian Ocean
C. The Maghrib
D. Sub-Saharan Africa
PART VI: THE MANY FACES OF ISLAMIC CALLIGRAPHY IN MODERN TIMES
Chapter 13: From traditional styles to calligraphic art and design
A. Traditional styles
B. Printing, typography, and computer graphics
C. Calligraphic art
Bibliography.

About the Author

Sheila S. Blair is the Norma Jean Calderwood University Professor of Islamic and Asian Art and the Boston College and Hamad bin Khalifa Endowed Chair of Islamic Art, Virginia Commonwealth University.

Reviews

I can think of no one more qualified to produce such a volume… She is a recognised and highly-regarded expert in the field
- Professor W. M. Thackston, Harvard University
Sheila S. Blair is a seasoned author with an excellent track record in publishing both specialised and general books on Islamic art. Indeed she is an undisputed star in her field.
- Professor Robert Hillenbrand, University of Edinburgh