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Higher Education in Scotland and the UK

Diverging or Converging Systems?

Edited by Sheila Riddell, Elisabet Weedon, Sarah Minty

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Exploring the impact on Scottish higher education of major constitutional change in Scotland and the UK

This book focuses on the challenges and opportunities faced by Scottish higher education post-referendum 2014. It draws on findings from a project on higher education within the ESRC’s Future of the UK and Scotland Programme, making an important and original contribution to the understanding of higher education policy in Scotland and the rest of the UK.

Central themes explored in different chapters include: the influence of marketisation and internationalisation on Scottish and UK higher education systems; university governance, devolution and the rescaling of the European state; the impact of widening access policies on territorial and social justice; young people’s views of higher education and the impact of the extended franchise; cross-border student flows and migration; research funding, knowledge economies and constitutional change.

Key features

  • First book to explore the impact on Scottish higher education of major constitutional change in Scotland and the UK
  • Analyses the impact of marketisation and internationalisation on Scottish and UK higher education in the light of new constitutional arrangements
  • Explores the implications of different fees and student support regimes for cross-border student flows and territorial and social justice
  • Considers the extent to which widening access policies in Scotland and the UK have opened up higher education for under-represented groups and the future of such policies in a new Scotland
  • Looks at the possible impact of a new immigration regime on the recruitment of international students, and the implications of different immigration rules for a common UK travel area
  • Examines the way in which higher education is viewed by young people in Scotland and England.

Contents

Acknowledgements
Dedication
Notes on contributors
List of figures and tables
Figures
Tables
1. Scottish Higher Education and Devolution;
2. Higher Education Governance and Institutional Autonomy in the Post-devolution UK
3. Student Funding in UK: Post-Devolution Scotland in a UK Context
4. Young People’s Attitudes Towards Student Debt in Scotland and England
5. Cross-border Flows of Students within the UK
6. Widening Access to Higher Education in Scotland, the UK and Europe
7. The Internationalisation of Higher Education in Scotland and the UK
8. Research Policy in Scotland and the Rest of the UK
9. Devolution and Higher Education Policy: Negotiating UK and International Boundaries
Appendix 1: Research Methods
Appendix 2: List of Acronyms

About the Author

Sheila Riddell is Director of the Centre for Research in Education Inclusion and Diversity at the Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh. She previously worked as Director of the Strathclyde Centre for Disability Research, University of Glasgow. Her research interests are in the broad field of equality and social inclusion, with particular reference to gender, social class and disability in the fields of education, training, employment and social care. She is the co-author of Resolving Disputes about Special Educational Needs: A Comparative Perspective on Special Educational Needs, Ashgate 2011. From the APF Sheila Riddell is Director of the Centre for Research in Education Inclusion and Diversity at the University of Edinburgh (www.creid.ed.ac.uk) and was previously Director of the Strathclyde Centre for Disability Research at the University of Glasgow. Her work explores themes of social justice and equality across a range of policy fields including education, social care and employment.

Elisabet Weedon is Deputy Director and a Senior Research Fellow of the Centre for Research in Education Inclusion and Diversity at the Moray House School of Education University of Edinburgh. Her main research interests are in the area of further and higher education, equality and social justice in education. She has worked on a range of research projects including studies of lifelong learning across Europe, disabled students in higher education and workplace learning.

Sarah Minty is a Research Fellow at CREID, Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh. She has particular interests in social justice and policy evaluation and has undertaken research in the school, vocational and higher education sectors. Sarah is currently working on a number of projects relating to higher education funding and access, and exploring how student finance affects young people’s higher education choices.

Reviews

This is a timely book which will be essential reading for all those interested in the impact of devolution on higher education in the UK. Drawing on a variety of data sources, it provides an authoritative analysis which questions some of the rhetoric which has surrounded these issues.

- Jim Gallacher, Centre for Research in Lifelong Learning, Glasgow Caledonian University

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