Difference and Disability in the Medieval Islamic World

Blighted Bodies

Kristina Richardson

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Outlines the complex significance of bodies in the late medieval central Arab Islamic lands

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Introduction
1. Physical Blights in Islamic Thought
2. Drug Overdose, Disability and Male Friendship in Fifteenth-Century Mamluk Cairo
3. Recollecting and Reconfiguring Afflicted Male Bodies in Fifteenth-Century Literary Anthologies
4. The Science of Men: Hadith Transmitters and Their Marked Bodies
5. The Blight of Male Baldness in Sixteenth-Century Mecca
Epilogue.
Richardson has written an original and highly learned first book that reveals much about the cultural construction of difference and disability and about scholarly friendships and communities that shaped that culture.
H-Disability, H-Net Reviews
Richardson has written an original and highly learned first book that reveals much about the cultural construction of difference and disability and about scholarly friendships and communities that shaped that culture.
H-Disability, H-Net Reviews
This book provides a plethora of information about Islamic attitudes to people with disabilities...Although written within a specific historical framework, Kristina Richardson’s book transcends these boundaries and provides the reader with new data on the literary, legal, and theological debates on the roles that people with disabilities could hold in society and in the religious life of their communities, beyond the Mamluk and Ottoman eras.
Vardit Rispler-Chaim, University of Haifa, Journal of the American Oriental Society
Kristina L. Richardson offers us invaluable insight [in her new book] which discusses disability, friendship, drug abuse, scholarly scandal, and love.
Taraneh Wilkinson, LA Review of Books
With few exceptions, we hardly have any scholarly treatment of the historically nuanced social and cultural condition of physical and mental impairment…This is why Richardson’s Difference and Disability in The Medieval Islamic World is so important. It is an indication of the growing field of disability history, and its expansion beyond mainly Western concerns.'- Miri Shefer-Mossensohn, Tel Aviv University, Review of Middle East Studies
Miri Shefer-Mossensohn, Tel Aviv University, Review of Middle East Studies
Kristina L. Richardson is an Assistant Professor of History at Queens College, City University of New York, and has held postdoctoral fellowships at the Universities of Münster and Bonn in Germany.

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