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Deleuze and Science

Paragraph Volume 29 Number 2

Edited by John Marks

Paperback (In stock)
£26.99

In response to Bergson's claim that modern science has not found its metaphysics, Deleuze remarked that it was this metaphysics that particularly interested him. In recent years, as the complexities of Deleuze's work have been critically evaluated, interest has grown in the important part that science and a corresponding metaphysics plays in this work, including the publications that were co-authored with Félix Guattari. Necessarily, much of this critical work has explored the precise nature of Deleuze's expressive materialism. It has been suggested, by Manuel DeLanda for example, that Deleuze's realist ontology has much in common with an intensive science that concentrates on the divergent processes that underpin the extensive world of finished products that we see around us. John Protevi and Mark Bonta have suggested that, in the same way that Kant's Critiques corresponded to a world of Euclidean space, Aristotelian time, and Newtonian physics, so Deleuze's philosophy helps to make sense of the world of fragmented space, twisted time and far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics that science is now exploring.

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Contents

Introduction, John Marks
Deleuze Guattari and Emergence, John Protevi
Chaosmologies: Quantum Field Theory, Chaos and Thought in Deleuze and Guattari's What is Philosophy?, Arkady Plotnitsky
Chaos and Control: Nanotechnology and the Politics of Emergence, Matthew Kearnes
Molecular Biology in the Work of Deleuze and Guattari, John Marks
Science and Dialectics in the Philosophies of Deleuze, Bachelard and DeLanda, James Williams
The Difference Between Science and Philosophy: the Spinoza-Boyle Controversy Revisited, Simon Duffy
Becoming Interdisciplinary: Making Sense of DeLanda's Reading of Deleuze, David Holdsworth.

About the Author

John Marks is Reader in French in the Department of Modern Languages at The Nottingham Trent University. He is the author of Gilles Deleuze: Vitalism and Multiplicity

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