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Cold War Film Genres

Edited by Homer B. Pettey

Hardback (Not yet published)
£70.00

Examines how Cold War films depicted pertinent issues of American social class and gender

From the mid-1940s to the late 1980s American film studios enjoyed commercial success in a range of often overlooked genres, employing a new realism to depict social class structures, capitalist desires and the expansion of the marketplace, and to turn American cultural values comically and subversively against themselves. With case studies of the Cold War comedy, the ‘rogue cop’ film, the brainwashing thriller and the urban romances that defined the ‘new woman’, Cold War Film Genres explores these myriad productions, redefining American cinematic history with a more inclusive view of the types of films that post-war audiences actually enjoyed, and that the studios provided for them.

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Contents

Acknowledgements

Illustrations

Notes on Contributors

1. Introduction: Cold War Genres and the Rock-and-Roll Film; Homer B. Pettey

2. Social Factors in Brainwashing Films of the 1950s and 1960s; David Seed

3. The Berlin Crisis? Piffl!: Billy Wilder’s Cold War Comedy, One, Two, Three; Ed Sikov

4. The Small Adult Film: A Prestige Form of Cold War Cinema; R. Barton Palmer

5. "I’m Lucky – I Had Rich Parents": Disability and Class in the Postwar Biopic Genre; Martin F. Norden

6. Rogue Nation, 1954: History, Class Consciousness, and the ‘Rogue Cop’ Film; Robert Miklitsch

7. Internal Enmity: Hollywood's Fragile Home Stories in the 1950s and 1960s; Elisabeth Bronfen

8. Suburban Sublime; Homer B. Pettey

9. Domestic Containment for Whom? Gendered and Racial Variations on Cold War: Modernity in the Apartment Plot; Pamela Robertson Wojcik

10. Success and the Single Girl: Urban Romances of Working Women; Jennifer Lei Jenkins

11. Paris Loves Lovers and Americans Loved Paris: Gender, Class, and Modernity in the Postwar Hollywood Musical; Steven Cohan

12. Straight to Baby: Scoring female jazz agency and new masculinity in Henry Mancini's Peter Gunn; Kristin McGee

Index

About the Author

Homer B. Pettey is Professor of Film and Comparative Literature at the University of Arizona. He serves as the founding and general editor for Global Film Directors (Rutgers U.P.), Global Film Studios (Edinburgh U.P.), and International Stars (Edinburgh U.P.).

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