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A History of Everyday Life in Scotland, 1800 to 1900

Edited by Graeme Morton, Trevor Griffiths

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£95.00
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This volume explores the experience of everyday life in Scotland over two centuries characterised by political, religious and intellectual change and ferment. It shows how the extraordinary impinged on the ordinary and reveals people's anxieties, joys, comforts, passions, hopes and fears. It also aims to provide a measure of how the impact of change varied from place to place.

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About the Author

Graeme Morton is Professor of Modern History at the University of Dundee having previous held the inaugural Scottish Studies Foundation Chair at the University of Guelph. His research focus falls on national identity, associational culture and diaspora studies. Recent publications include Ourselves and Others: Scotland, 1832–1914 (Edinburgh, 2012), A History of Everyday Life in Scotland, 1800 to 1900 (Edinburgh, 2010) and Irish and Scottish Encounters with Indigenous Peoples (Montreal & Kingston, 2013).

Trevor Griffiths is Reader in Economic and Social History at the University of Edinburgh. Educated at the University of Oxford, he has carried out research on working-class society in Britain in the early twentieth century, before turning more recently to examine aspects of popular culture. He was Co-Investigator on the three-year AHRC research project, ‘Early Scottish Cinema, 1896-1927’.

Reviews

This book, part of a landmark new series on the history of the everyday in Scotland, will become a fixture in the bibliographies of historians, students, and interested readers alike. The series consists of four volumes covering everyday life from the medieval period up to the twentieth century and aims to examine, "the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of the Scottish people" (ix). Some of the best historians in their field have contributed to this volume, in nine specialist chapters. There is also a very good series introduction, an introduction to the volume, an annotated bibliography, and a plethora of fascinating illustrations, making it an excellent resource for readers… It is a roaring success; theoretically informed, and all of the chapters clearly linked to create an admirably coherent whole without any overlap-the authors and editors are to be congratulated.
- Annie Tindley, Glasgow Caledonian University, Journal of British Studies
This book, part of a landmark new series on the history of the everyday in Scotland, will become a fixture in the bibliographies of historians, students, and interested readers alike. The series consists of four volumes covering everyday life from the medieval period up to the twentieth century and aims to examine, "the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of the Scottish people" (ix). Some of the best historians in their field have contributed to this volume, in nine specialist chapters. There is also a very good series introduction, an introduction to the volume, an annotated bibliography, and a plethora of fascinating illustrations, making it an excellent resource for readers… It is a roaring success; theoretically informed, and all of the chapters clearly linked to create an admirably coherent whole without any overlap-the authors and editors are to be congratulated.
- Annie Tindley, Glasgow Caledonian University
Given the high quality of the series so far, it is no surprise that  there is much to commend the book. It covers a diverse range of  topics, and it manages to strike a good balance between Highland and Lowlad, urban and rural... Most strkiingly, it is highly interdisciplinary, drawing uppon scientific, sociological and anthropological methodologies to provide a rich and original account of the everyday... Overall, A History of Everyday Life in Scotland 1800-1900 will doubtlessly and deservedly establish itself as a crucial asset for student of 19th century Scotland. As a simple collection of interesting and informative essays it is successful enough, but, in common with the previous entries in the series, its true value lies in its ability to synthesise exisiting research, while simultaneously advertising the exciting new ways in which Scottish historical scholarship could develop over the coming years. At once a compendium and a rallying cry, it represents a valuable addition to the exisiting literature.
- Allan Kennedy, University of Stirling, History Scotland

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